Carole shows us her calf. Bull!   Leave a comment

Posted by vp19 on 2014.11.03 at 11:21

Current mood: busybusy

carole lombard p1202-1688c front

Once again, Carole Lombard shows off her agricultural side in Paramount p1202-1688 from 1937, but if you think you can milk this picture, boy, have you got a surprise. That’s because the bovine with her is masculine, not feminine:

carole lombard p1202-1688b back

History has not recorded the ultimate fate of “True Confession” the bull, but despite the tender loving care Lombard gave it, the animal likely ended up as someone’s dinner.

Like to wind up as this picture’s owner? At least one other person does too, and as of this writing, he or she has placed a bid for $9.99. The photo measures 7.25″ x 9.5″ and is said to be in very good condition, with “some minor creases at the corners.” Bidding on this item is slated to end at 9:08 p.m. (Eastern) Sunday. To bid or learn more, visithttp://www.ebay.com/itm/Carole-Lombard-playing-with-a-calf-original-candid-portrait-photo-1937-Paramount-/381041089974?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash=item58b7d19db6.

clara bow it 1927b royal theater kansas city

I hope many of you caught Carole last night on Turner Classic Movies in the rarely seen 1927 Mack Sennett short “Smith’s Pony.” That’s sort of a prelude to the channel’s star angle this month, the legends of silent cinema, set for each Monday. The event kicks off tonight and well into Tuesday morning with a look at some of the top female stars of the silver screen, from Mary Pickford (“Poor Little Rich Girl,” 1917, 8 p.m. EST) to Clara Bow (“It,” 1927, 9:30 p.m.), followed by Gloria Swanson (“Sadie Thompson,” 1928, 11 p.m.), Pola Negri (“The Wildcat,” 1921, directed by Ernst Lubitsch, 12:45 a.m.), Louise Brooks (“Pandora’s Box,” 1928, 2:15 a.m.), Lillian Gish (“Way Down East,” 1920, 4:45 a.m.), Marion Davies (“Show People,” 1928, 7:15 a.m.), Greta Garbo (“Torrent,” 1926, 8:45 a.m.) and Alla Nazimova (“Camille,” 1921, 10:15 a.m.). And let’s hope that sometime soon, TCM also shows some of the legendary actresses it tends to overlook, such as Colleen Moore (whose restored final silent, “Why Be Good?”, has just been released on DVD) and sisters Constance and Norma Talmadge. More on the event can be found at http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/1042501%7C1042506/Robert-Osborne-on-Silent-Stars.html

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Posted November 3, 2014 by vp19 in Uncategorized

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